I Went Somewhere: The Sitio Pantad Adventure last August 20-21

The Travel On the way to Tobias Fornier (Dao). A little bit gloomy. City to Dao I’ve been preparing for this visit for a week: contacted the proper people for accommodations and meet-ups, budgeted my money to allot an amount for my own snacks and fare and for what I could bring to the community, charged my phones and camera, and prepared myself for possible scenarios while mentally noting tentative interview questions. I came from Iloilo city the day of 20th and traveled to Tobias Fornier at around 12 in the afternoon. I haven’t had a particular playlist for this trip, just anything good and appropriate to the mood of the bus ride. It was a 3-hour travel, of highways in the first hour and of the refreshing seascape and landscape in the next two. Just as the famous line goes, Antique is where the mountains meet the sea. Indeed! The road going to Tobias Fornier via San Joaquin is like a borderline between the seascape and the mountainside. The air is fresh and cool. The hue of green mountains and of the emerald sea is rich, freshly bathed with the previous night’s rain. Town proper to barangay From the town proper of Tobias Fornier, or more commonly known as Dao, a local motorcycle transport called habal-habal will bring you to Barangay Igkalawagan in a span of 20 minutes, through the muddy dirt roads of the mountainside. It was always a bumpy ride going there. Barangay to the sitio And from the barangay, the sitio or the community is a 15-minute walk away, which requires hiking, crossing a river, and passing through rice fields. Nothing really dangerous but can cause scratches and bruises if one is not careful enough. Of mud, bare-footing, and river. Speaking of which, let me narrate the struggle of going there. When it’s summer, which it was during one of my visits, it was relatively easy to travel from the barangay going to the community. The river is dry so I didn’t take off my shoes and didn’t walk barefoot. Problem during summer is, it’s hot. It is easy to walk and hike but never easy to dodge the heat. I remember I was wearing long sleeves to avoid getting sun burns but it was really hot I was soaking with sweat the moment I arrived at the community. Not only soaking. But I was also panting. In rainy season, however, it is undeniably a challenge. But these are the kinds of challenges I enjoy doing because I get something memorable from slipping or stumbling. My last visit there was raining very hard due to a forming typhoon. I went to the community four in the afternoon and did the documentation and interview. It wasn’t raining then but it rained the previous night that the river was flowing with ankle-deep torrent. By six in the evening, I’m stuck at the community due to…

A Touch of Korea from the Philippines!

Due to our university’s calendar shift, June and July became our vacation. Most of June I was just waiting for one particular message. It arrived at the third week of June, that I was accepted on the job that I applied for and I was to come back last week of June to start. And so I got the books I needed provided by the management for my job and reviewed them all so I can make a good first impression to my students on the first day of job. It was a tutorial job for Koreans, mostly university students from Silla University, Gumi University, and Halla University, with a few exceptions of regular students who came to study to prepare for a job abroad. It was the first legit, out-of-school job I had so I was really excited to earn money, to face the real world, meet new people, and nervous as to how I would start my classes. And I was living alone in the city, eating alone, sleeping alone in my rented boarding house, and becoming more independent. It was indeed exciting! So I reviewed my books and prepared my introductory speech the night before my big day. And more importantly, I researched on the Korean culture so I can fit in and be appropriate at most times. So gays are a big taboo in Korea, I learned. I heard a nervous chuckle in my head. It was a challenge I’m willing to take, see how I can able to survive it. Well, let’s get this started with! The first day turned out fine. I met my students and we exchanged facts about ourselves – our hobbies, our major, etc. I must say I had cute students, in the Filipino standards. The job was so exhausting. I had to wake up at six every morning and teach from eight to six in the evening. So I had to bring coffee in class. It was only very later when I asked them if they know what I am, gender-wise. Or in some cases, when they asked me if I had a girlfriend. So I burst out laughing and had to explain. They had mixed reactions. Some would be struck with the truth that I am homosexual and I find it very amusing. Oh, how the Filipinos and Koreans differ in this aspect of culture. Luckily, I never had a hard time coming out to my students. As a matter of fact, I had this one memorable student, her English name is Belle, and we would talk about boys during our tutor time. Well, not during the entire time. Let’s say, half of the time we study and the other half we’d chat about her boyfriend and my crushes. Hahaha! I also had this one group class where my students were really fun. They’d make fun of their classmates during class discussions when someone from the class mispronounces a word. I’d let them analyze poetry, music videos, and movies and I’d see how they were struggling to find justifiable explanations. It was satisfying in my part to play the teacher for some time when my entire university time is centered to being the student. And for some time, I’m certain they were enjoying the class. Who wouldn’t? I’m such a cool teacher. Another funny thing about this experience is that I asked my students to teach me Korean. And so I learned quite a number of words and phrases. Even the bad words. Hahaha! Some of my students would cringe hearing these words, while some would laugh saying I sound cute speaking their curse words. At some point, I had this one student who taught me Korean phrases and tell me it means this and that but turned out they mean something else. So when I asked my other students what these phrases mean, they’d laugh hard because these phrases are either Korean jokes or teenage lingo. Moreover, I earned more friends. I like these friends I met there because we easily click. They’re genuine and fun…